The Mighty Junebugg – a June of all Trades


Maui Day 2: Sunrise at Haleakalå
June 17, 2009, 7:20 pm
Filed under: Life, Maui, Travel

Our 2nd day on Maui began early… AT 2AM EARLY!!! Our friends from the island said it took a couple of hours to get to the summit and they weren’t lyin’! Ipo, Kanoa & Shann showed up knockin on our door at 1:45 in the morning. None of us wanted to wake up but we did and were out the door by 2am. We packed breakfast to go and were on our way…

Sassy making breakfast

Sassy making breakfast

Bagels w/ cream cheese, tomato, lettuce and cream cheese

Bagels w/ cream cheese, tomato, lettuce, cucumber and cream cheese

after about 45 min we had our first glimpse of sunlight

after about 45 min we had our first glimpse of sunlight

even the Long Beach Gorilla showed up to view the spectacle

even the Long Beach Gorilla showed up to view the spectacle

the sky grew brighter

the sky grew brighter

and brighter but still no sun

and brighter but still no sun. If you look close you can still see Mars!

 

at 10,023ft above sea level and above the clouds

at 10,023ft above sea level and above the clouds

 

the sun finally peeks above the clouds

the sun finally peeks above the clouds

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Goooooood Morning Haleakalå!

Goooooood Morning Haleakalå!

the light glares were amazing

the light glares were amazing

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the colors were amazing!

the colors were amazing!

 

the whole crater was illuminated

the whole crater was illuminated

Sunrise crew: Long Beach Gorilla, Sassy, Junebugg, J Ross Parrelli, Lindsey Love, Shann, Kanoa & Double A. Ipo took the pic and Dinah was back at the spot sound alseep

Sunrise crew: (backrow) Long Beach Gorilla, Sassy, Junebugg, J Ross Parrelli, Lindsey Love, Shann, (front row) Kanoa & Double A. Ipo took the pic and Dinah was back at the spot sound alseep

what a beautiful way to start the day!

what a beautiful way to start the day!

ah haa, we tried to look gangster but ended up looking like clowns

ah haa, we tried to look gangster but ended up looking like dorks

 

It felt nice to add another stamp to my National Parks book this year and to visit the only National Park in the Hawaiian Islands. The park includes the summit depression, Kipahulu Valley on the southeast, and ʻOheʻo Gulch (and pools), extending to the shoreline in the Kipahulu area. From the summit, there are two main trails leading into Haleakalā: Sliding Sands Trail and Halemauʻu Trail.

The temperature near the summit tends to vary between about 40°F and 60°F and, especially given the thin air and the possibility of dehydration at that elevation, the walking trails can be more challenging than one might expect. Despite this, Haleakala is popular with tourists and locals alike, who often venture to its summit, or to the visitor center just below the summit, to view the sunrise. There is no lodging, food, or gas available in the park.

The History:

Early Hawaiians applied the name Haleakalā (“house of the sun”) to the summit area only, most likely because from the west side of the island, the sun could be seen rising up over the eastern side of the mountain. In Hawaiian folklore, the depression at the summit of Haleakalā was home to the grandmother of the demigod Māui. According to the legend, Maui’s grandmother helped him capture the sun and force it to slow its journey across the sky in order to lengthen the day. In modern times, Haleakalā has become synonymous with the entire East Maui volcano.

From the summit one looks down into a massive depression some 11.25 km (7 mi) across, 3.2 km (2 mi) wide, and nearly 800 m (2,600 ft) deep. The surrounding walls are steep and the interior mostly barren-looking with a scattering of volcanic cones. The volcano is officially considered active[1] and has produced numerous eruptions in the last 30,000 years. This volcanic activity has been along two rift zones, the southwest and east. These two rift zones together form an arc that extends from La Perouse Bay on the southwest, through the Haleakalā Crater and to Hāna, to the east. The east rift zone continues under the ocean beyond the east coast of Maui as Haleakalā Ridge, making the combined rift zones one of the longest in the Hawaiian Islands chain.

Until recently, East Maui Volcano was thought to have last erupted around 1790, based largely on comparisons of maps made during the voyages of La Perouse and George Vancouver. Recent advanced dating tests, however, have shown that the last eruption was more likely to have been in the 1600s.[2] These last flows from the southwest rift zone of Haleakalā make up the large lava deposits of the Ahihi Kina`u/La Perouse Bay area of South Maui. In addition, contrary to popular belief, Haleakalā “crater” is not volcanic in origin, nor can it accurately be called a caldera (which is formed through when the summit of a volcano collapses to form a depression). Rather, scientists believe that Haleakalā’s “crater” was formed when the headwalls of two large erosional valleys merged at the summit of the volcano. These valleys formed the two large gaps — Ko‘olau on the north side and Kaupō on the south — on either side of the depression.


1 Comment so far
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wow..those sunrise shots are ill!

Comment by Smooth J




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